Apr 122010
 

Human radiation experiments

Researchers in the United States has performed thousands of radiation experiments in humans to determine the effects of ionizing radiation and radioactive contamination on the human body, usually from people who were poor, sick, or powerless. Most of these tests have been carried out, funded or controlled by the U.S. Army, Atomic Energy Commission, or various other U.S. federal government.

The experiments included a wide range of studies on things like food food radioactive or mentally handicapped children conscientious objectors, insertion of radium rods into the nose of school-age children, deliberately releasing products radioactive chemicals in U.S. and Canadian cities, to measure health effects of radioactive fallout from nuclear bomb tests by injecting pregnant women and babies with radioactive chemicals, and irradiation testicles of prisoners, among others.

Ultimately, public outcry over the experiences of the Advisory Committee on the experiences of 1994 Radiation rights.

Radioactive iodine experiments

In 1953, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) has several studies on the health effects of radioactive iodine in the newborns and pregnant women at the University of Iowa. In one study, researchers gave pregnant women from 100 to 200 microcuries of iodine-131, to consider the women aborted embryos in an attempt to discover at what stage, and to what extent, radioiodine crosses the placental barrier. In another study, they gave 25 infants (aged less than 36 hours and weighs from 5.5 to 8.5 pounds) of iodine-131, either orally or by injection, so that they can measure the amount of iodine in their thyroid gland.

In another study, ACS, researchers at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine fed iodine-131-28 infants in good health through a stomach tube to test the concentration of iodine in the glands of infants of the thyroid.

In 1953 an operation called “green” the ACS fell radiodine-131 and xenon-133 on a surface of 500,000 hectares, which contained three small towns near the Hanford site in Washington.

In 1953, the ACS has sponsored a study to discover whether radioiodine affected differently preterm infants born at term. In the experiment, researchers at Harper Hospital in Detroit oral iodine-131-65 preterm and term that weighed 2.1 to 5.5 kg.

Cover of the final report of Project 4.1, which examined the effects of radioactive fallout on the natives of the Marshall Islands

Cover of the final report of Project 4.1, which examined the effects of radioactive fallout on the natives of the Marshall Islands

Experiments with uranium

Between 1946 and 1947, researchers at the University of Rochester injected uranium-234 and uranium-235 at doses ranging from 6.4 to 70.7 micrograms per kilogram of body weight in six study how much uranium their kidneys could tolerate before becoming damaged.

Between 1953 and 1957, Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr. William Sweet eleven patients injected with uranium as part of research funded by the Manhattan Project. In exchange for uranium-235 for his experiments, he would send the tissues of dead patients, so researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory could be analyzed to analyze the potential health effects of exposure to uranium for the atomic bomb factory workers.

Experiments with plutonium

In 1945, under the Manhattan Project, three patients at Billings Hospital at the University of Chicago have been injected with plutonium.

In 1946, six employees of a Chicago metallurgical laboratory are given water contaminated with plutonium-239, so that researchers could study how plutonium is absorbed into the digestive tract.

Experiments involving other radioactive materials

Immediately after World War II, researchers at Vanderbilt University gave 829 pregnant women in Tennessee said they were “vitamin drinks” that would improve the health of their baby, but were, in fact, mixtures containing radioactive iron to determine how fast the radioisotopes entered the placenta. At least three children are known to have died of experiments, cancer and leukemia. Four babies died of cancer in women after experiences, and women have experienced rashes, bruising, anemia, hair loss / tooth, and cancer.

From 1946 to 1953, the School of Walter E. Fernald State of Massachusetts, in an experiment sponsored by the U.S. Commission of Atomic Energy and the Quaker Oats Company, 73 mentally disabled children were fed oats containing radioactive calcium and other radio-isotopes to follow ” how nutrients are digested. Children were not told they were fed radioactive chemicals and were informed by hospital staff and researchers to join a science club. ”

In the 1950s, researchers at the Medical College of Virginia conducted experiments on the burn, most of them poor and black, without their knowledge or consent, with funding from the military and in collaboration with the ACS. In the experiments, subjects were exposed to combustion, an experimental antibiotic treatment, and injections of radioactive isotopes. The amount of radioactive phosphorus-32 injected into some of these patients, 500 microcuries, was 50 times the “acceptable” dose for a healthy individual, for people with severe burns, which probably led to mortality rates increased significantly.

Atmospheric blast from Castle Bravo tests, which killed and injured numerous indigenous Marshall Islanders and U.S. Servicemen, and are still causing numerous birth defects and other health issues in the Marshall Islands

Atmospheric blast from Castle Bravo tests, which killed and injured numerous indigenous Marshall Islanders and U.S. Servicemen, and are still causing numerous birth defects and other health issues in the Marshall Islands